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San Francisco Corral

Westerners International

San Francisco Corral - Westerners International

October 2017

Volume 14

Number 8

Please join us on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. for

Walking San Francisco’s 49 Mile Scenic Drive!

Walking San Francisco’s 49 Mile
Scenic Drive!

49 Mile Scenic Drive Sign

San Francisco’s 49 Mile Scenic Drive was born eighty years ago to show off the best of the City by the Bay to the millions of people invited to attend the 1939–40 Golden Gate International Exposition. The 49-mile loop trail around the entire city was a great hit!

In 2013, Kristine Poggioli and Carolyn Eidson walked the entire route—not in one day (sheesh!)—but over the course of one year. They had so much fun they decided to research the history along each mile of the drive and turn their adventure into a turn-by-turn guidebook, cleverly titled Walking San Francisco's 49 Mile Scenic Drive. Their lively program is filled with the quirky, unknown history they uncovered on the way.

Books will be available for sale and signing!

Fior d'Italia
2237 Mason Street, San Francisco
(map)

The restaurant provides us with a private room and valet parking. We gather at 5:30 p.m. Dinner seating begins at 6:15 p.m. A three course selection is available for dinner at the cost of $39.00.

R.S.V.P. - Please send checks and dinner reservations by October 20th to: Judy Van Austen, KOC, 1789 Northwood Court, Oakland, CA 94611.

We Need Books!

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Round-up! Donations of books, ephemera and other
Western-themed memorabilia are needed for our
monthly raffle! Your donations will be much appreciated!

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*********

Round-up! Donations of books, ephemera and other
Western-themed memorabilia are needed for our
monthly raffle! Your donations will be much appreciated!


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Our October program will focus on the 49 Mile Scenic Drive, which was created in anticipation of tourists visiting San Francisco for the 1939-40 Golden Gate International Exposition. The fair was held to celebrate the opening of the city’s two new bridges. The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge was dedicated on November 12, 1936; the Golden Gate Bridge was dedicated on May 27, 1937; and on August 26, 1937, dredging for man- made Treasure Island, the site of the fair, was complete. Treasure Island was designed to be the city’s airport, and it did briefly serve in that capacity throughout the run of the fair, and shortly thereafter, until the U.S. Navy took over Treasure Island as America prepared to enter World War Two.

Our October program will focus on the 49 Mile Scenic Drive, which was created in anticipation of tourists visiting San Francisco for the 1939-40 Golden Gate International Exposition. The fair was held to celebrate the opening of the city’s two new bridges. The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge was dedicated on November 12, 1936; the Golden Gate Bridge was dedicated on May 27, 1937; and on August 26, 1937, dredging for man- made Treasure Island, the site of the fair, was complete. Treasure Island was designed to be the city’s airport, and it did briefly serve in that capacity throughout the run of the fair, and shortly thereafter, until the U.S. Navy took over Treasure Island as America prepared to enter World War Two.The only airplanes that consistently operated from Treasure Island were the Pan Am Clippers, which offered the first regular commercial passenger service from the United States to the Orient. Since the clippers were sea planes, the Port of the Tradewinds was constructed between man-made Treasure Island and the natural island of Yerba Buena to provide a watery landing strip.

Only diplomats and the ultra-rich were able to travel aboard the clippers. According to the Pacific Aviation Museum, a one-way trip from San Francisco to Hong Kong would set you back $1,368 – in 1939 money! The interiors were fashioned in the mode of passenger trains or ships, only far more luxurious. There were separate private quarters for sleeping, meals were served in an area that resembled a railroad dining car, and general rooms were provided for games and entertainment.

In short, San Francisco was celebrating its new-found accessibility. Prior to the construction of the bridges, travel by land was only feasible from the South Bay. Commuters from the North or East bays would board the ferry, and automobile owners had the option of having their cars transported by ferry as well. The Key System, which had formerly connected railroad passengers to the ferry, operated a two-way passenger railroad line on the lower deck of the newly constructed Bay Bridge. And those who could afford airline travel now had the option of flying to and from the City of San Francisco.

But plans for a permanent airport on Treasure Island were scuttled. The United States armed forces had been stationed on Yerba Buena Island for many years, and citizens were seriously worried about enemy submarine attacks in the early 1940s. Treasure Island afforded an unobstructed view of the Golden Gate, from whence enemy watercraft could be observed. Also, aviation technology had developed at an unforeseen pace, and it was determined that Treasure Island would not be large enough to serve as an airport. The existing airport down on the peninsula was expanded, and the U.S. Navy set up operations on Treasure Island. Can you imagine the traffic jams on the Bay Bridge if the airport had been located at Treasure Island?

Today, as San Francisco is rapidly expanding, commuters are necessarily reverting to public transportation, not only by bus and intercity trains, but by ferries traveling across the bay. Historic streetcars, which require far less maintenance than their modern computerized counterparts, rumble down Market Street just as they did 100 years ago. The automobile is perhaps the most cumbersome way of traversing the streets of the City by the Bay. All the old methods of transportation are new again. And now, authors Kristine Poggioli and Carolyn Eidson have cleverly described the joys of walking the 49 Mile Scenic Drive – a route that was initially developed in the mid-twentieth century age of the automobile.

The only airplanes that consistently operated from Treasure Island were the Pan Am Clippers, which offered the first regular commercial passenger service from the United States to the Orient. Since the clippers were sea planes, the Port of the Tradewinds was constructed between man-made Treasure Island and the natural island of Yerba Buena to provide a watery landing strip.

Only diplomats and the ultra-rich were able to travel aboard the clippers. According to the Pacific Aviation Museum, a one-way trip from San Francisco to Hong Kong would set you back $1,368 – in 1939 money! The interiors were fashioned in the mode of passenger trains or ships, only far more luxurious. There were separate private quarters for sleeping, meals were served in an area that resembled a railroad dining car, and general rooms were provided for games and entertainment.

In short, San Francisco was celebrating its new-found accessibility. Prior to the construction of the bridges, travel by land was only feasible from the South Bay. Commuters from the North or East bays would board the ferry, and automobile owners had the option of having their cars transported by ferry as well. The Key System, which had formerly connected railroad passengers to the ferry, operated a two-way passenger railroad line on the lower deck of the newly constructed Bay Bridge. And those who could afford airline travel now had the option of flying to and from the City of San Francisco.

But plans for a permanent airport on Treasure Island were scuttled. The United States armed forces had been stationed on Yerba Buena Island for many years, and citizens were seriously worried about enemy submarine attacks in the early 1940s. Treasure Island afforded an unobstructed view of the Golden Gate, from whence enemy watercraft could be observed. Also, aviation technology had developed at an unforeseen pace, and it was determined that Treasure Island would not be large enough to serve as an airport. The existing airport down on the peninsula was expanded, and the U.S. Navy set up operations on Treasure Island. Can you imagine the traffic jams on the Bay Bridge if the airport had been located at Treasure Island?

Today, as San Francisco is rapidly expanding, commuters are necessarily reverting to public transportation, not only by bus and intercity trains, but by ferries traveling across the bay. Historic streetcars, which require far less maintenance than their modern computerized counterparts, rumble down Market Street just as they did 100 years ago. The automobile is perhaps the most cumbersome way of traversing the streets of the City by the Bay. All the old methods of transportation are new again. And now, authors Kristine Poggioli and Carolyn Eidson have cleverly described the joys of walking the 49 Mile Scenic Drive – a route that was initially developed in the mid-twentieth century age of the automobile.

Treasure Island Airport

Illustration of the proposed airport on Treasure Island in the May 1938 issue of Popular Mechanics magazine. The three buildings pictured here, the semi-circular airport terminal and the two airplane hangars, are the only buildings from the time of the fair that remain today.

Pan Am Clipper docked

A Pan Am Clipper docked in the Port of the Trade Winds during the Golden Gate International Exposition. Photo courtesy of the San Francisco Library.

Pan Am Clipper

A Pan Am Clipper flying over Treasure Island. This view shows the port that was constructed to provide a safe harbor for the sea planes to land. Postcard issued in 1940.

China Clipper cross-section

A cross-section of the China Clipper shows relaxation rooms, private sleeping quarters and the pilot’s cabin. Image courtesy of the National Air and Space Museum.

Noteworthy Events

San Francisco Museum and Historical Society

The San Francisco Museum and Historical Society – Tuesday, November 14, 7:30 p.m. PROGRAM: Starring the Rock: Alcatraz in Hollywood Movies. Shortly after Alcatraz opened as a federal prison in 1934, its career as a setting for movies began. From Alcatraz Island (1937) through Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), Hollywood depicted life on the isolated island. After the prison closed in 1963, a new era began. Point Blank (1967) was the first to film there after the prison’s closure, followed by such memorable titles as The Enforcer (1974), Escape from Alcatraz (1979), The Rock (1996), and X- Men: The Last Stand (2006). This evening of film clips celebrates the 80th anniversary of The Rock as a setting movies and its 50th anniversary as a filming location. Jim Van Buskirk is the co-author of Celluloid San Francisco: The Film Lover’s Guide to Bay Area Movie Locations and presenter of the popular program, “On Location: The Golden Gate Bridge on the Silver Screen.” Roosevelt Middle School, 460 Arguello Blvd. (at Geary; entrance on Palm). www.sfhistory.org. Admission for non-members is $10.00 per person or $5.00 for seniors, students, K-12 teachers, and persons with disabilities. Admission fees may be applied to membership dues within 45 days.


California Historical Society

California Historical Society – Saturday, October 14, 12 noon to 5:00 p.m. Opening day block party for two exhibitions linking the emerging histories of America and California: Alexander Hamilton – Treasures from the New-York Historical Society and Meanwhile out West – Colonizing California, 1769–1821. Enjoy snacks from a food truck, meet local non-profits and cultural institutions from around San Francisco and the Bay Area, hear the Dueto Arte band perform at 3:00 p.m. There will be short presentations throughout the day. 678 Mission Street, San Francisco. Gallery admission is $5.00; Members and children free.


San Francisco Maritime Museum

San Francisco Maritime Museum – Saturday, October 14, 2017, 3:00 p.m. – Wheat on the Imperial Fringe: Spanish California, Climate Change, and the Fate of Empires. Learn about the interplay between maritime trade, climate change, & conflict between Spanish and Mexican Alta California, Imperial Russia, Great Britain, and the American Republic between 1812 and 1848. Aboard the schooner C.A. Thayer, Hyde Street Pier, Hyde and Jefferson Streets, San Francisco. Park admission fee of $10.00 applies; admission is valid for one week, and allows access to all historic ships on the pier. Information: (415) 561-7006.


S. F. Heritage

Haas-Lilienthal House – Mayhem Mansion San Francisco! Friday and Saturday, October 20-21 & October 27-28. Mayhem Mansion returns for its fifth year of twisted shenanigans. This year’s tours are extra special since guests will get a sneak peek at recent renovations before the house reopens to the general public in November. Your fun begins in the foyer, where a groovy ghoulie will lead you on a magical tour through the rotting rooms and historic halls. It seems that recent construction may have shaken a few ghosts loose, and you never know who or what may be lurking in the corridors! Your tour ends in the Spookeasy, our Halloween haven stocked with refreshments and fun. Haas-Lilienthal House, 2007 Franklin Street, San Francisco. Purchase tickets through EventBrite.com; Search “Mayhem Mansion SF.” $20.00 for adults; $15.00 for children. Cash and credit cards accepted at the bar. Proceeds benefit the continued maintenance and preservation of the Haas-Lilienthal House under the direction of San Francisco Heritage.

S. F. Westerners Posse 2017

Sheriff:

Robert Chandler, PhD
[email protected]

Sheriff:

Robert Chandler, PhD
[email protected]

Trail Boss:

Ask how you can assist us here

Trail Boss:

Ask how you can assist us here

Registrar of Marks & Brands:

We also need help here

Registrar of Marks & Brands:

We also need help here

Keeper of the Chips:

Judy Van Austen, (510) 339-1298
[email protected]

Keeper of the Chips:

Judy Van Austen, (510) 339-1298
[email protected]

International Rep.:

Gerhard Brostrom, (510) 524-5984
[email protected]

International Rep.:

Gerhard Brostrom, (510) 524-5984
[email protected]

Marshal:

Bob Lawhon, (415) 519-3972
[email protected]

Marshal:

Bob Lawhon, (415) 519-3972
[email protected]

Inkslinger:

Kathryn Ayres, (415) 583-9916
[email protected]

Inkslinger:

Kathryn Ayres, (415) 583-9916
[email protected]

Inkslingers Emeritus:

Tom McLaughlin; Richard F. Olson; Mary Lou Lyon, HM

Inkslingers Emeritus:

Tom McLaughlin; Richard F. Olson; Mary Lou Lyon, HM

In order for you and your friends and organizations to continue to receive this publication, send us both your email and snail mail address.
Email: [email protected]

In order for you and your friends and organizations to continue to receive this publication,
send us both your email and snail mail address.
Email: [email protected]

Mark your calendar for the S.F. Corral of Westerners’ meeting dates for 2017 (usually the fourth Tuesday of the month): this month, October 24; (No meeting in November); December 5.

Northern Nevada Cattle Crive

Marshal Bob Lawhon regularly saddles up for a small cattle drive in Northern Nevada. He and his posse herd cattle up to Northern California for the summers, and then to the plains of Nevada near where the annual Burning Man festival is held. It takes four or five days. Marshal Bob is the camp cook, and he does his best to keep the tin cups full of hot coffee and the tin plates full o’ grub. While he and the boys were moseyin’ along one day, the wagon boss spotted the remains of a cow that had likely been killed by wolves. The skull had been bleached by the sun. The band of cowpokes salvaged the skeleton. The little bit of hide that remained was just enough to fashion into horse whips. Marshal Bob kept the skull for himself, because it reminded him of Old Joe, our old buffalo. The skull is pictured here along with a his favorite belt buckle, a gift from his wife Zeny, embossed with the image of another skull from the bovidae family. This photo was taken at our September meeting, where Marshal Bob placed these items on display.